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Feb
14

TFC Recycling adds CNG Trucks


TFC Recycling Adds Five More CNG Trucks to its Fleet and Opens Area’s First CNG Fleet Maintenance Shop

Chesapeake, Virginia, – February 13, 2012 – TFC Recycling has added five new compressed natural gas (CNG) trucks to its fleet, making it the largest private owner and operator of clean-running, collection trucks in Virginia. It has also opened Hampton Roads’ first fleet maintenance shop capable of working on CNG vehicles.

At a news conference at TFC’s Chesapeake maintenance facility today, 4th District Congressman Randy Forbes applauded the company for taking a leadership role in alternative energy. “TFC is setting a high standard in its industry and in Virginia by investing in CNG technology,” said Forbes. “This is good for the Commonwealth and for the nation.” The Director of Virginia Clean Cities, Alleyn Harned, told the audience of municipal and business leaders that TFC Recycling is to be congratulated for “stepping up as high impact leaders to support cleaner domestic fuel alternatives.”

TFC estimates that its six CNG trucks will each year displace 60,000 gallons of diesel fuel, which helps the environment and reduces the nation’s dependency on foreign oil. CNG powered vehicles produce just half of the emissions that federal guidelines allow, making TFC Recycling’s collection fleet among the cleanest in Virginia.

TFC Recycling’s new 20-bay maintenance facility is CNG compliant and the first of its kind in Hampton Roads. Mechanics there are certified in alternative fuels, which means they can assist other businesses that are interested in CNG conversion and maintenance.

“When it comes to transportation, the Commonwealth takes an all fuels approach,” says Cathie France, Virginia’s Deputy Secretary of Energy.

“Governor McDonnell is therefore pleased to see companies like TFC Recycling embrace and use fuels such as natural gas, which mean cleaner air in Virginia and more American jobs.” At the news conference, TFC Recycling was presented with a formal resolution from the Governor commending the company for its progressive green initiatives and use of natural resources.

“Recycling paper, glass and metals is our principal line of work,” says Michael Benedetto, President of TFC Recycling, “but we are equally committed to new technologies that promote a cleaner environment and demonstrate corporate leadership. We believe that having six CNG trucks is a good example, and we look forward to adding even more as well as a natural gas filling station in the near future.”

The six CNG trucks will be visible immediately providing curbside pickup service in Chesapeake, Virginia Beach, Suffolk and the Outer Banks. TFC hopes to add more cities to its network, enabling them to join in a nationwide movement to switch more trucks from petroleum-based fuels to natural gas.

TFC Recycling is a locally owned and operated recycling and waste removal company, providing residential and commercial recycling and waste removal. Established in 1973, TFC Recycling believes “it’s not how many customers we serve, but how we serve our customers.” TFC Recycling employs more than 350 people and recycles more than 250,000 tons annually thereby diverting it from the landfill.

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1 comment

  1. Masami says:

    At the home level, we are taking advantage of increased options for glass recycling in our neighborhood started by a beer brewery in collaboration with various groups and this was badly needed after our curbside recycling program dropped glass. We gather non 1 and 2 plastic and when in the neighborhood of a city recycle site,drop that off. We recycle newspaper plastic wrappers along with plastic (when we get them)grocery bags at our grocery store but prefer paper bags which we then recycle in our local school’s paper recycle with our newspapers. We try to use cloth bags for grocery shopping. We also give paper and plastic grocery bags to our church food pantry for use with their clients. We compost all leaves and grass clippings at home as well as fruit and vegetable kitchen scraps. One of our two cars (two working adults) is a hybrid. We open shades to use solar passive heating and try to turn down the thermostat in winter. We don’t do a good job on doing meatless, driving less, etc. I just bought my first LED bulb which will last longer than I will be alive if I am to believe the label!!

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